Dr Manhattan vs Batman (and by proxy, everyone else)

This is the only time I’ll say it, Batman would probably lose.

Can’t Dr Manhattan see the future? He’d see everything coming.

Dr Manhattan can perceive his own future but he can’t change it. Like he said, he’s just a puppet who can see all the strings. If you read Before Watchmen, he can effect and change the outcome of an event by traveling to a point in his timeline and observing it. Doing so collapses the quantum state into a new possibility (…or something), but it seems it’s not a change he has any control over.

It’s best to look at Dr Manhattan as being from a higher dimension - when he interacts with three dimensional beings (us, for example), he does so in a way we understand but he isn’t at all limited to our concepts and limitations. When he’s talking to Laurie on Mars he says this, ‘You complain that I refuse to see life on life’s terms. And yet you continuously refuse to see things from my perspective. If only you’d try to see the whole continuum, life’s pattern, you’d understand.’ The problem is she actually isn’t able to see things from his perspective (he obviously doesn’t understand this).

In that sense he is almost untouchable (hence his increasing alienation from the world). That doesn’t mean he is all powerful and omniscient (although it’s fair to assume ‘death’ is another concept he doesn’t adhere to; ‘She’s aging more noticeably every day…while I am standing still.’) The easiest way to put it is that he just plays by a different set of rules. It’s also worth noting that the Dr Manhattan we see in Watchmen is still very much getting to grips with his new reality - he can’t understand Laurie’s limitations (probably not unlike trying to imagine what it’s like to be born blind), he assumes that his vision of the future is foggy because of probable nuclear fallout, he accidentally changes history in Before Watchmen through ‘misuse’ of his powers and in the end he decides to try out creating life.

At best he would be indifferent to Batman, at worst he’d paint him all over the floor.

vicariousvandal:

facethecourt:

Diana: People like us are really alone, aren’t we?

- Justice League #12

I loved this so so much.

(Source: superior--spiderman)

Before Watchmen evokes pretty strong reactions but I’m fairly irreverent about the whole thing. Do I need more Watchmen? About as much as I need a trilogy of Hobbit films; if they justify themselves, I’m all for it.

I’ve not picked them up across the board but I’ve been following a few. Minutemen I have enjoyed. It’s a story of other heroes in another time and has been a good read, Darwyn Cooke’s art is also exceptional and a great match for the story. Ozymandias is gorgeous book, this time by Jai Lee on art, but beyond the first couple issues I’m not sure it will have anything to say. I gave up on Comedian half way through the first issue, I love the character but I didn’t need more of him, same with Rorschach (although I haven’t given it a chance yet, I may change my mind). So it’s pretty hit and miss, except for one…

Dr Manhattan. I absolutely love this. Honestly, I could read a whole book based around Dr Manhattan’s musings and the first issue is very much that, until the last page. Many will take this as blasphemy but I would be happy for Dr Manhattan to be folded into the main DC Universe (imagine what The Man of Tomorrow would say to the man who knew what tomorrow brought). He brings objectivity to his realities, he’s like an anthropologist from a higher dimension. By being this ‘other’ he has an ability to observe events from a completely different perspective. He is hesitant to get involved but by simply observing he is getting involved. The genius of this book is that it makes him the subject of his own observation and in doing so literally changes everything. I absolutely love it.

Two issues in and J Michael Straczynski has done an absolutely masterful job and Adam Hughes’ art is pitch perfect. I cannot wait to see where it goes. Fingers crossed it ends as strong as it started. It’s a shame that a lot of people will miss this simply because the believe Before Watchmen is an affront to the original and its creators.

Can’t say I’ve really felt any need to pick up Justice League for any other reason than it’s Justice League, but that might have changed with issue #13. Enter Cheetah, a villain I’m not that familiar with beyond her history with Wonder Woman. She seems like a strange choice for a Justice League villain but by the end of the issue she justifies her appearance and I look forward to where the story goes.
The Wonder Woman/Superman things is also addressed a couple times. I like it. As far as I can see, these two belong together. I don’t care fore Louis Lane and Diana could definitely teach Clark a thing or two about restraint.
Cyborg’s story crawls along. He is a curious character. He went through a major trauma, half of him was replaced by a machine…and yet that’s never really been an issue for him. We do get some all too brief musing on his machine/human existence. Frankly it’s pretty tragic, it took a whole year for one of the super friends to notice or ask him any personal questions, and only then it’s because Flash is left alone with him after being kicked out of the room but Supes and Wondy. I feel this reboot is a huge missed opportunity for Cyborg. I absolutely abhor his costume, it doesn’t reflect the look of modern technology whatsoever and he barely has a personality, which is a real shame because there is so much potential in the character.
It’s taken a year but it looks like Johns might just be getting the team dynamic finally working. That’s almost definitely helped by an absent Hal Jordan. Wonder Woman felt more in tune with her solo book this issue too, which is a relief since her solo book is a riot and give no end of credence to her title of Wonder Woman. We can only hope someone drags Cyborg out of the depths of utter mediocrity and gives him the story he deserves but this is inching in the right direction. There’s also a hint that Batman and Aquaman could be quite an amusing duo.
Also, a shout out to Tony S. Daniel’s art. I’m not a big fan of Jim Lee, it feels a little too static. Daniel’s art feels dynamic.
Justice League 13# is not without its flaws but finally I’m looking forward to next month’s Justice League.

Can’t say I’ve really felt any need to pick up Justice League for any other reason than it’s Justice League, but that might have changed with issue #13. Enter Cheetah, a villain I’m not that familiar with beyond her history with Wonder Woman. She seems like a strange choice for a Justice League villain but by the end of the issue she justifies her appearance and I look forward to where the story goes.

The Wonder Woman/Superman things is also addressed a couple times. I like it. As far as I can see, these two belong together. I don’t care fore Louis Lane and Diana could definitely teach Clark a thing or two about restraint.

Cyborg’s story crawls along. He is a curious character. He went through a major trauma, half of him was replaced by a machine…and yet that’s never really been an issue for him. We do get some all too brief musing on his machine/human existence. Frankly it’s pretty tragic, it took a whole year for one of the super friends to notice or ask him any personal questions, and only then it’s because Flash is left alone with him after being kicked out of the room but Supes and Wondy. I feel this reboot is a huge missed opportunity for Cyborg. I absolutely abhor his costume, it doesn’t reflect the look of modern technology whatsoever and he barely has a personality, which is a real shame because there is so much potential in the character.

It’s taken a year but it looks like Johns might just be getting the team dynamic finally working. That’s almost definitely helped by an absent Hal Jordan. Wonder Woman felt more in tune with her solo book this issue too, which is a relief since her solo book is a riot and give no end of credence to her title of Wonder Woman. We can only hope someone drags Cyborg out of the depths of utter mediocrity and gives him the story he deserves but this is inching in the right direction. There’s also a hint that Batman and Aquaman could be quite an amusing duo.

Also, a shout out to Tony S. Daniel’s art. I’m not a big fan of Jim Lee, it feels a little too static. Daniel’s art feels dynamic.

Justice League 13# is not without its flaws but finally I’m looking forward to next month’s Justice League.

"Is he trying to tell Batman what he can’t do?"
"Twenty American Dollars says Batman breaks his Jaw."
Justice League International #2

"Is he trying to tell Batman what he can’t do?"

"Twenty American Dollars says Batman breaks his Jaw."

Justice League International #2

vicariousvandal:

Holy mother of pain, just read Aquaman #1. I take back every joke I ever made about him. Aquaman is fucking awesome.

vicariousvandal:

Holy mother of pain, just read Aquaman #1. I take back every joke I ever made about him. Aquaman is fucking awesome.

vicariousvandal:

A quick sketch and ink of Harley Quinn from the cover of Suicide Squad #1.

Definitely wanting more Suicide Squad.

vicariousvandal:

A quick sketch and ink of Harley Quinn from the cover of Suicide Squad #1.

Definitely wanting more Suicide Squad.

I picked up Voodoo #1 as part of my ‘it sounds dire and thus is probably awesome’ incentive. So did this deliver? Hell yes it did. The art was pretty essential in making the book more than the sum of its parts. Sam Basri does an amazing job. Priscilla is drawn in graceful motion as she strips. She is the ‘object’ that everyone is watching, including the reader, but she is also returning the gaze. It works to undermine the assumed power relations. This is emphasized in the scene where she transforms and strikes the agent; her shadow, still in human form, appears to dance.

Jessica Kholinne’s colours are phenomenal. The lighting is stunning. There is a general smokey miasma in The Voodoo Lounge. Ron Marz essentially threads it all together. His pacing is perfect and the dialogue it tight, for the most part.
Voodoo is a book that deserves closer inspection. I hope it doesn’t get overlooked because I’m looking forward to seeing where this one goes.

I picked up Voodoo #1 as part of my ‘it sounds dire and thus is probably awesome’ incentive. So did this deliver? Hell yes it did. The art was pretty essential in making the book more than the sum of its parts. Sam Basri does an amazing job. Priscilla is drawn in graceful motion as she strips. She is the ‘object’ that everyone is watching, including the reader, but she is also returning the gaze. It works to undermine the assumed power relations. This is emphasized in the scene where she transforms and strikes the agent; her shadow, still in human form, appears to dance.

Jessica Kholinne’s colours are phenomenal. The lighting is stunning. There is a general smokey miasma in The Voodoo Lounge. Ron Marz essentially threads it all together. His pacing is perfect and the dialogue it tight, for the most part.

Voodoo is a book that deserves closer inspection. I hope it doesn’t get overlooked because I’m looking forward to seeing where this one goes.

Yes. Fucking YES. That’s my reaction to the opening couple pages of Wonder Woman #1. DC have tried to maintained this trinity of Superman, Batman and Wonder Woman. The problem is Wonder Woman just hasn’t been up to scratch. The public perception of her is so stunningly camp I’m almost surprised Adam West wasn’t cast as her in the 70s TV Show. Come on! She’s fucking Wonder Woman. The most recognisable female superhero around. She deserves better. What Wonder Woman needs, just as Batman did, is her very own Year One. So, is this it?
We’re only a single issue in so obviously it’s hard to say but things look promising. Everything has been updated. The gods feel young and yet ancient, both heartless and down to Earth, terrifying and yet beautiful. Everything definitely errs on the side of horror; the gods treat the inhabitants of Earth as playthings, either burning out the bodies of three young ladies converted to oracles or beheading horses to form vicious centaurs. Cliff Chang has done an astounding job piecing together a world with bold and defining lines. The whole thing does seem to hint at Batman Year One whether that is intentional or not. The colours are both vibrant and muted. This is very much a dark world, filled with horrors and illuminated by magic and power.
In a nice nod to Flashpoint we first meet Diana in London (and as far as I’m concerned, from now on she’s a London gal). Almost instantly she is thrown into a battle between monsters and gods and Wonder Woman kick bloody ass. Almost literally, this book has buckets full of the red stuff. Brian Azzarello’s writing is great if not a little unclear sometimes. I eagerly look forward to the rest of his take on our favorite Amazon.
I don’t think anyone can accuse Wonder Woman of being camp anymore. This is definitely another book I’ll be sticking with.

Yes. Fucking YES. That’s my reaction to the opening couple pages of Wonder Woman #1. DC have tried to maintained this trinity of Superman, Batman and Wonder Woman. The problem is Wonder Woman just hasn’t been up to scratch. The public perception of her is so stunningly camp I’m almost surprised Adam West wasn’t cast as her in the 70s TV Show. Come on! She’s fucking Wonder Woman. The most recognisable female superhero around. She deserves better. What Wonder Woman needs, just as Batman did, is her very own Year One. So, is this it?

We’re only a single issue in so obviously it’s hard to say but things look promising. Everything has been updated. The gods feel young and yet ancient, both heartless and down to Earth, terrifying and yet beautiful. Everything definitely errs on the side of horror; the gods treat the inhabitants of Earth as playthings, either burning out the bodies of three young ladies converted to oracles or beheading horses to form vicious centaurs. Cliff Chang has done an astounding job piecing together a world with bold and defining lines. The whole thing does seem to hint at Batman Year One whether that is intentional or not. The colours are both vibrant and muted. This is very much a dark world, filled with horrors and illuminated by magic and power.

In a nice nod to Flashpoint we first meet Diana in London (and as far as I’m concerned, from now on she’s a London gal). Almost instantly she is thrown into a battle between monsters and gods and Wonder Woman kick bloody ass. Almost literally, this book has buckets full of the red stuff. Brian Azzarello’s writing is great if not a little unclear sometimes. I eagerly look forward to the rest of his take on our favorite Amazon.

I don’t think anyone can accuse Wonder Woman of being camp anymore. This is definitely another book I’ll be sticking with.

period by KRUNK Interactive